30 Days of Njord, Day 18: Rune of Gambling

I was journeying and checking in with Njord and a few others last week when I finally told Him that I was out of inspiration for His 30 days. (I’m pretty much burned out on a bunch of things, and my devotional practice is getting the worst of it, unfortunately.) His response? “Focus on the rune of gambling.”

My first thought was, the rune of gambling? WTF is the rune of gambling? I assumed he wanted me to create a bindrune about gambling, but I was unclear what the focus should be. Like, for gamblers, so they win? Or to help people take risks? Do we even have a God of Gamblers, or stories about them? So I went away a bit bewildered, but let it pass. These things generally make more sense as time goes on.

A few days later, I was putting together the usual handout that I use in my rune classes. This month, our runes are Eihwaz and Perthro. It wasn’t until I was literally typing the up the section on Perthro and looking for a picture of a dice cup to go along with it that I realized that the “rune of gambling” was Perthro! Perthro, the dice cup, which is “a source of recreation and amusement to the great, where warriors sit blithely together in the banqueting-hall.” Duh. I took it as a sign that I should get back to my rune work. (That’s the gods for you; ever helpful in keeping me on track.)

But yes, one aspect of prosperity and generosity is gambling, which fishermen and Vikings also did while waiting out the hours on those long boat rides around the world. Hail the pastime of sailors!

dice cup

Gambling–what I also do each time I open myself up to hear the Gods and agree to do Their work. 🙂

30 Days for Njord, Day 16: The Lore

Njord, Thorskegga.jpeg

 

Recently I was tracking down some examples in the Lore in which Njord is called “a wise Wan (Vanir)” and I came across this article. It lays out almost every mention of Njord that we have from the Sagas and the Eddas, from Odin’s conversation with the wise jotun Vafþrúðnir in the Vafþrúðnismál regarding which Gods survive Ragnarok, to the reference of Njord as a king of Sweden in the Heimskringla.

Njord Vanir, King of Sweden It’s definitely worth bookmarking for future reference.